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Updated: 18 hours 17 min ago

Velorutionaries - Kevin Kimber

Wed, 2017-11-22 18:45

What do you do for a living?

I work in technology, and having spent the past fifteen years starting and scaling software businesses, I decided to start my own Advisory company working with start up and early stage technology companies to help them launch and scale. I spend my week working with some of the most innovative new companies advising them on strategy, and meeting with investors. I also work with a couple of charities that are focused on inspiring the next wave of entrepreneurs by going into schools, colleges and universities to talk about all things business.

What are you passionate about?

I am passionate about technology and its role in disrupting existing industries for the good of enterprise and society.

How long have you been a cyclist?

I have been a cyclist since I was able to walk. In my teens and twenties I was a very keen mountain biker, however as I’ve got a little older I more typically ride in the country lanes or on towpaths near where I live with my wife and daughter, hunting out new pubs to stop in. I also use my bike for commuting to and from the station as my work is typically in London.

What bike are you riding?

I am the very proud owner of a Pashley Speed 3, which is a limited edition launched to celebrate Pashley’s 90th Anniversary. It’s matt black and is great fun to ride.

What appeals to you about cycling?

Cycling is a great way to keep fit whilst doing something that I really enjoy. For me cycling tends to be less about the destination and more about the ride, and what I see on the way.

How often do you ride?

Most days to the station and then longer rides in the evenings and weekends.

What’s your favourite cycle route or destination?

My favourite cycle route is from my home along the canal to one of the many good pubs in either direction.

Categories: Liveable cities

Velorutionaries - Elsie Martins

Wed, 2017-11-22 18:36

What do you do for a living?

I work at BBC Radio 4, working closely with radio production teams from all areas and genres. Scheduling all the variant parts together in a cohesive way is a big task, and I really love being at the centre of the jigsaw puzzle. The Radio 4 schedule is so diverse, it is endlessly fascinating.

What are you passionate about?

I’m an avid sound enthusiast and field recordist, and have an absolute passion for sound design. As a sound artist I am always looking for interesting soundscapes, and I am eager to capture atmospheres. I often record my rides, especially my morning commute. I find the bike’s mechanical rhythm combines perfectly with the varying city soundscape, embracing the array of locations you can ride through, from a gentle canal ride to the madness of the city centre traffic whizzing past you.

How long have you been a cyclist?

I’ve been cycling to work for a quite few years now, and I absolutely love it. London is an old city with higgledy- piggledy streets, narrow lanes are challenging and the bus lane is also often the cycle lane and the parking lane all at once. In central London cyclists need their wits about them. I plan my cycle route so that I use quieter streets and residential areas. I whizz passed quieter areas with pretty inner city squares, avoiding busy junctions for the most part, until I can get to dedicated cycle lanes.

What bike are you riding?

I ride a Brompton limited edition nickel, and it is wonderful. The flexibility of a fold up means I can ride anywhere and just carry the bike with me, pop it under a table, at my desk, in a café, at the pub. My bike follows me everywhere.

What appeals to you about cycling?

There’s definitely a cathartic element to riding. Whether it’s a commute through quiet London streets at the crack of dawn, or a stress relief at the end of a busy day. There’s nothing like it. Not to mention saving time and money on your commute, and getting t. It’s a no brainer. Nothing beats it for me.

How often do you ride?

I ride every day! I commute to work in the week come rain or shine and I’ll often go for a ride at the weekends.

What’s your favourite cycle route or destination?
I love to cycle by the canal, near Hackney marshes, or by the Stoke Newington reservoirs. It’s very peaceful and you forget the busy roads and mad traffic.

Categories: Liveable cities

Velorutionaries - Deborah Connolly

Wed, 2017-11-22 17:53

What do you do for a living?

I’m a student at UCL. I’m just about to start my master’s year reading Natural Sciences, majoring in Cell Biology.

What are you passionate about?

Obviously my studies, which I like to consider unravelling the mysteries of life! I’m also passionate about sailing, which has been central to large majority of my life. Recently my family completed an Atlantic crossing to the Caribbean, now we have either the way back to look forward to, or just continue all the way around!

How long have you been a cyclist?

I’ve been cycling since I was a toddler! I won’t let my Dad live down taking off my stabilisers when I was three - apparently he didn’t want the hassle of putting them back on... (I’m obviously very hard done by). Many holidays have been spent cycling, from mountain biking in the Alps in tours from the UK, to Greece and Denmark.

What bike are you riding?

I have the Gazelle Tour Populair, which was my 21st birthday present. It’s a classic Dutch bike, with all the features - from dynamo to an in-built rear wheel lock, and of course the Brooks saddle.

What appeals to you about cycling?

I enjoy the ease and freedom travelling around London by bicycle. Most of the time it is quicker to cycle around London than any other means of transport.

How often do you ride?

I ride almost every day, mainly to and from university. However wherever I’m off to I want to take my bike!

What’s your favourite cycle route or destination?

I like to do one long cycle per week, usually at the weekends, where I’ll head from Camden down to Wandsworth, along the river on the cycle “superhighway” (a bright blue cycle lane...). Cycling around Cambridge is also great. I hope with London becoming more cycle-friendly, it will be something that Cambridge soon emulates too.

Categories: Liveable cities

Velorutionaries - Andrew Davidson

Wed, 2017-11-22 17:41

What do you do for a living?

Partner with PDP London, an Architectural Practice with offices in London and Hong Kong, and director with Sustainability Consultants Eight Associates.

PDP’s public projects in London include Duke of York Square in Chelsea, the Saatchi Gallery, concert venue Cadogan Hall, and the 5 star hotel 45 Park Lane. Current commissions include a new hotel

What are you passionate about?

Transforming spaces and places through great design to create “Architecture that Matters”. I’m a life long cycling enthusiast and like to ride everywhere, taking the opportunity to vary my route and explore new places along the way.

How long have you been a cyclist?

I’ve always ridden daily to school, uni or work, and started “road riding” about 12 years ago. I ride with friends in south London, and with the property industry fundraising charity “Club Peloton”.

What bike are you riding?

Strida Evo. The bike projects individuality, non-conformity, radical thinking, a different approach to design. And life. I first saw the Strida on the BBC TV programme ‘Tomorrow’s World’ in the 1980’s and have always admired its innovation and simplicity. I like the fact that it looks radically different to a traditional bike, but is great for commuting. I appreciate the fact that the Strida can be folded and wheeled along, rather than being “lugged around”. Lots of people ask what it is, and comment saying they like it or think it’s “cool”

What appeals to you about cycling?

The ease and convenience of being able to zip across town, combined with the opportunity to work some exercise and mental “down time” into the day. It’s a great way to clear the mind and “reset”. I’m too restless for meditation!

How often do you ride?

Pretty much every day. I commute between home in Herne Hill and the architectural practice in Chelsea, also visiting the environmental team in Southwark. Like my bike, my route’s often a big triangle! At weekends I ride a carbon road bike, and take on challenges like the 1450km “Club Peloton” Cycle to MIPIM”. This year I did the Tour of Flanders sportive and am doing the Étape.

What’s your favourite cycle route or destination?

I love zipping round the West End, providing there’s not too much squeezing through traffic. Further afield, it has to be dramatic mountains or coast; Chapmans Peak Drive at dawn is hard to beat.

Categories: Liveable cities

Velorutionaries - Alessandro Gasparato

Wed, 2017-11-22 17:03

 

What do you do for a living?

I’m a deputy store Manager for Barbour, the classic British wax jacket manufacturer. I work in the store just off Carnaby Street, where we stock a more limited range of products called Heritage.

What are you passionate about?

I do love music, any kind really. I also love traveling, playing tennis, cycling and hiking.

How long have you been a cyclist?

Coming from Italy I have always sat on a saddle! It’s been my main vehicle throughout my teenage years. I suspended the cycling period when I got a vintage Vespa, but since I moved to London in 2013 I rediscovered the great functionality of bikes...plus it’s free to go around the city with one.

What bike are you riding?

I was originally interested in getting a VanMoo. I’ve always been interested in the concept of simple Dutch-style commuting bikes, but then I visited your store in Great Portland Street and I saw a Pelago Bristol. What a beauty! One week later I had already ordered one, and it is my daily companion right now.

It is a black single speed, back pedal, rear brake bike. I have customised it with my black Brooks B17 Flyer, and with a front steel basket attached to the front rack.

What appeals to you about cycling?

It is difficult for me to pinpoint specific reasons since I have been always in contact with bikes; it is not a rational thought but more the sense of ‘normality’. It represents freedom, a more sustainable way of moving, cheaper and also quicker travel in most cases. I do like the sense of participation you get from cycling, especially here in London where you have a proliferation of clubs, and so many commuters or bike-lovers.

How often do you ride?

I do cycle every day with my Pelago bike. During weekends I also use it for short pleasure rides. It comes in handy for carrying my groceries back from the market.

What’s your favourite cycle route or destination?

I do love riding when I am in Italy, especially the countryside or hilly- mountain places in my region, Veneto: I do this with race bikes though. Here in the UK I don’t have a favourite destination, since I use the bike for commuting, and I haven’t had a chance yet to visit the countryside with a bike. If I have to choose one I think I can say the Regent’s Canal. It is a bit crowded, but the view is great.

Categories: Liveable cities

Moulton Speed

Thu, 2017-11-09 17:27

Categories: Liveable cities

Moulton SST 11 Alfine

Thu, 2017-11-09 17:18

Categories: Liveable cities

Schindelhauer Siegfried

Thu, 2017-11-09 16:57

Street Perfection with Schindelhauer's front Rack equipped Siegfried

Categories: Liveable cities

Velorutionary Joachim Bjerg

Wed, 2017-10-18 12:16
Biomega OKO

What do you do for a living?

I work for a large betting and gaming company based in central London. I’m a Country Manager, with the overall responsibility for a number of international focus regions.

What are you passionate about?

I’m a world traveler and try to get away as often as possible. London is a fantastic hub in this regard, as you can get to almost anywhere in the world very easily. I’m also a huge sports fan, work out in one way or the other on a daily basis, and follow Arsenal and my Danish team Brøndby religiously.

How long have you been a cyclist?

I’m from Copenhagen in Denmark, where you almost learn to ride a bike at the same time as you learn to walk. So I’ve been riding a bike since I was 2 and a half years old for pleasure, commuting and everything in between.

What bike are you riding?

I’ve just purchased a Biomega OKO electric bike. My daily commute has become much longer recently, so I felt like a bit of pedal assistance was needed. It’s an amazing bike, and the way Biomega have integrated the battery and made it look stylish really appealed to me. I was stopped a handful of times on the street within the first week, by strangers who are curious about which brand it is. Furthermore, Biomega is a Danish brand, which is the reason I discovered it to begin with, and why I’m more inclined to support the brand.

What appeals to you about cycling?

I like the way cycling allows me to blend exercise, commuting and saving money on travel cards into one. I don’t like the crowded tube in the morning, and use my commute as a chance to reflect and think things through. I often plan my day at work while I ride my bike in the morning, and clear my head on the ride home in the evening.

How often do you ride?

I ride to work more or less every day,
so normally 5 days a week. Because my commute is quite long I don’t usually ride on the weekends, or for pleasure any longer.

What’s your favourite cycle route or destination?

I’m not sure I really have one, as Green Lanes during rush hour is not particularly scenic. However, I have had the pleasure of riding the Champs-Élysées loop during a sponsored event on the final day of the Tour De France, which was memorable. 

Categories: Liveable cities

Velorution Moulton AM Builds

Sun, 2017-09-17 21:48

These are some of the examples of our recent customer builds of AM Moulton Bikes:

Moulton Jubilee 105

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Moulton Marathon

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Categories: Liveable cities

Ultra light Uber cool - Ahooga

Mon, 2017-09-04 19:19

City style has never been so breezy

Your options for pedal-assisted folding bikes have never been richer, but then many would argue choices remain limited for ‘doing it in style’, unless you’re willing to go to extraordinary custom-build lengths, of course.

Belgium-designed Ahooga brings to the table plenty more than a smooth aesthetic and if you’ve some aspirations for something with unique flair then the label is well versed in delivering custom paintwork within a four week turnaround. Theoretically available in 215 colours spanning matt or glossy finish, there are few other folding labels willing to go to such lengths to deliver love at first ride.

Even by electric bike standards, the ride is effortless. Built around a super-stiff aluminium frame, and nimble 20-inch wheels, there are hints of BMX-like agility paired with the comfort of a sit up and beg bicycle. Finally, a hint of city speed is delivered via a smattering of high-end componentry, as well as the trusty kick of an EU certified powerful 250W rear hub motor.
Per charge, the Ahooga will typically deliver between 50 to 70 kilometers of assistance, all depending on your local topography. The battery can, of course, be switched off to save the juice on the flats. Should you wish to travel under one’s own steam the a 52 tooth chainring at the front will deliver great top-end speed, while a 11 to 28 tooth cassette opens up further potential as the inclines steepen.

The fold is intuitive: a lift of the saddle sees the rear wheel pivot under the frame. A further fold at the handlebar and you’re ready to hit the tube. It’s a mere ten second process to pack the bike down to 33” x 29” x 11”. Lifted at the top tube, your non electric build will tip the scales at just 10 kilograms; adding a battery and motor only adds a 3kg penalty, placing the Ahooga among the more manageable e-folding packages on the market.

Attention to detail, a crucial factor in any folding build, is taken a step further with clever roll and snap guards that will protect from urban road grime. There’s no overkill here, the bike retains elegance, but adds convenience with features like a theft-protection ID and trusty Schwalbe Kojak tyres as standard. For added puncture protection, an upgrade to Marathon Plus tyres is also an option.

Fancy the full Ahooga package? Customers can pick and choose from a range of transport covers, bags, baskets, racks, phone mounts and child seats, all available to order alongside your build of choice.

Categories: Liveable cities

Abus Kranium

Tue, 2017-08-22 13:46

Designer Anirudha Surahbi’s Kranium liner is a brilliant innovation. It’s strong, flexible, and offers unrivalled protection to your head if you’re unlucky enough to come off your bike.

You hope that the helmet you wear will protect you in the a crash.
But safety has been slow to progress – until now. After three years in development, the Abus Performance and Abus Ecolution Helmet, each with a Kranium liner, marks a revolution in helmet technology. The Kranium liner was created by industrial designer and Royal Collage of Art graduate Anirudha Surahbi. He was inspired to come up with it after a cycling accident, which resulted in a cracked helmet and a concussion. “Helmets hadn’t changed in 40 years,” he says. If your helmet receives an impact it should be replaced because it develops small fractures,” he explains.

The inspiration for using honeycomb cardboard came from a nature documentary. He learnt that a woodpecker will peck a tree 10 times a second and its head goes through a huge amount of shock every time it makes contact. The woodpecker has honeycomb- structured cartilage that reduces the force of the impact. Surabhi saw that this structure could be an ideal basis for a ultra-safe, strong, lightweight helmet. The Kranium helmet uses laser-cut, dual-density recycled honeycomb cardboard. The board is built into a lattice structure, that is designed to be stiff in certain places and flexible in others. each segment is slotted together with a simple numbering system, and these pieces form a protective shell for your head.

When tested against the British Standards (EN 1078) at Imperial College, the Kranium absorbed more than three times the amount of impact energy compared with regular cycling helmets. So, during a crash, the impact is reduced, making it less likely you’ll suffer head injury. When standard helmets are tested according to the EN 1078 standards, they record impact values ranging from 200 to 250g. When the Kranium helmets were tested at TUV test labs in Germany and HPE test labs in Surrey, they recorded improved impact values ranging from 75g to 170g. Ani explains “Some helmets only just meet regulations and some helmets on the market don’t get anywhere near. This is the reason why we designed the Kranium: it’s stronger and safer.”

Categories: Liveable cities